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20130422
20130422
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? >> guest: how do we work to prevent those? well, you know, we have testimonyings, cyber technologies, prevention technologies. we spend a lot of time now looking at detection technologies. but, again, if we ever got the kind of attack that hurt our critical infrastructure to which the president referred, we also are pretty good on resiliency, redundancy and response and recovery programs like we did with hurricane sandy. peept dumont is president and ceo of the air traffic control association. mr. dumont, your answer to that question. >> guest: there have been some attacks on the system. ta abt becau it'spublicized and confidential information and, obviously, you don't want too many people to know how the air traffic control system works. it's difficult to explain air traffic control in a sound bite. it's happened up in alaska, and what's being done now is we have very ancient infrastructure for air traffic control. it's been around since late '50s, early '60s, and it's a mix of different equipment. so it's very insecure. right now we're in a modernization phase where we're modernizi
, tools and technologies. war the, what are the best technologies we can use for both prevention and te -- detection. secondly, on the issue of information sharing, what are the things we need to do to improve the information sharing flow between government and industry, and that is a focus of our discussions with the various agencies who we deal with. and thirdly, very important for us is response and recovery. again, we build a lot of redundancy and resiliency in the system. we do recovery pretty well like hurricane sandy. we brought 67,000 crews from all over the country to help get the system back on. but cyber is somewhat different. and so we're working very, very diligently on a response and recovery plan. so if there is an outage, if there is caused by cybersecurity, we can come back quickly. >> but, again, the question really is th oama administration and mnyate democrats have maintained the implementation of standards even if they are baselines for critical infrastructure sectors would compel better behavior. have you seen that in the electric industry that that the establishme
's because of years of federal support to develop hydrofracking technology. the eastern gas shales project was an initiative the federal government began back in 1976 before hydrofracking was a mature industry. the project set up and funded dozens of pilot demonstration projects with universities and private gas companies that tested drilling and fracturing methods. this investment by the federal government was instrumental in the development of the commercial extraction of natural gas from shale. in fact, microseismic imaging, a critical tool used in fracking, was originally developed by sandia national laboratory, a federal energy laboratory. the industry was also supported through tax breaks and subsidies. in fact, mitchell energy vice president dan stewart said in an interview that mitchell energy's first horizontal well was subsidized by the federal government. mr. mitchell said, and i quote -- "d.o.e., that's the department of energy, d.o.e. started it and other people took the ball and ran with it. you cannot diminish d.o.e.'s involvement." so the basis of the natural gas revolution
, but if you think about the success in reducing alcohol-impaired driving through technology, through sanctions, through education, through engineering, we can do the same thing about drugged driving. but the most important thing was atten the public, and i think that's what we've done. thank you, bob. >> we are almost out of time. but before asking the last question, we have a couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all, i'd like to remind you about our upcoming luncheon events. on april 19th patrick donahoe, postmaster general, usps, will discuss challenges meeting the evolving demands of the nation's postal system. on may 7th, chris evert, tennis legend and publisher "tennis" magazine. and on june 3rd we will host the annual presentation of the gerald r. ford journalism awards. second, i would, with great feeling -- [laughter] in view of how you've covered your topic and you've generated so many questions, wow, i mean, i think -- i don't know if we keep track of a record and for handling them so well. i'd like to present you with the traditional npc mug. [applause] the scri
, but this is where can't i enter the way i did, that i certainly see that with the technology going the way it is and with drone technology advancing a drone to small and smaller, they're not going to be the giant, the big predators that are flying over pakistan. they will be little small drones that could be armed with things. this is not science fiction here in terms of, this is actually happening. >> host: booktv is a location on the campus of the university of southern california at the al late-onset to our books. we are talking with mark mazzetti, security correspondent and author of this book, "the way of the knife." jim, you're the next caller. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i to question. i've already posted to one of the largest providers of service to the cia and also the war department in afghanistan. and i asked him howe a fghans was going. and i quote him in this remark right now. he says that is basically a total failure. and then went into details about that aspect of what basic means. what do you think the result is basically in afghanistan? >> guest: well, yeah, it's
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5